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ScienceOnline2012 – #scio12 across social media – is the sixth annual international meeting on science and the Web.
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Thursday, January 19
 

8:00am

Morning check in

Arrive early, get a ticket for an espresso drink from the Kona Chameleon coffee truck outside, grab some breakfast and meet some new friends.

Breakfast items include bagels with cream cheese and jam, assorted muffins, yogurt and fresh fruit. Breakfast, coffee and tea will be served in Room 1a/b.

Thursday January 19, 2012 8:00am - 9:45am
McKimmon Conference Ctner (1101 Gorman St., Raleigh, NC 27606)

9:30am

Take your seats, please

Help us start on time, please.

Thursday January 19, 2012 9:30am - 9:45am
Room 1c/d

9:45am

Welcome remarks and conference overview
We kick off the conference with short remarks and reminders about our key values: conversation, community and respect.
Moderators
avatar for Anton Zuiker

Anton Zuiker

Co-founder and chairman of the board, ScienceOnline
Blogger, editor, organizer.

Thursday January 19, 2012 9:45am - 10:00am
Room 1c/d

10:00am

The Vain Girl's Survival Guide to Science and The Media
Ever wonder how an NFL Cheerleader turns Fulbright Scholar, field scientist, PhD and TV host? Even if the answer is no, come take a look at some cool gorilla pictures from Congo. With a little humor and lots of candour, I'll share stories of my death-defying adventures around the world, including surviving a plane crash, being chased by gorillas and discovering a new species of primate with a film crew in tow. Which of course meant my hair had to be perfect.
Moderators
Thursday January 19, 2012 10:00am - 11:00am
Room 1c/d

11:15am

Cybersecurity: Defense Against the Dark Arts
Think about everything you have online. Blog posts, emails, personal information - the record of years of your life. How safe is it? How do you know if you are doing enough? Worrying too much? From basic password management to dealing with personal threats, this session will tackle questions of security and safety online. Come share your strategies and war stories, trade information on emerging trends, and help us combat hacks and attacks on the ScienceOnline community.
Thursday January 19, 2012 11:15am - 12:15pm
Room 3

11:15am

Dealing with Data
On the importance of data publication, data management, and discovery in the sciences - from the tools that serve as enablers (ChemSpider, FigShare) to the broader issues affecting how we approach data-driven science and sharing of information (access, ownership, social stigma). This session will build upon Open Data sessions of the past, and look at how we can make better use of information to not only surface new insights, but do better science, as well as reward contributions in a way that reflects the move to digital.
Thursday January 19, 2012 11:15am - 12:15pm
Room 8

11:15am

The Path from Research to Book: Tools & Workflow Tips from Top Writers
Once we used index cards. Now we use ... well, what do we use? And how do we use it Writing any book, especially a science book, involves gathering and then somehow harnessing and drawing from an enormous amount of raw material — scientific papers; articles, video, audio from mass media; notes from reading in a huge variety or sources; interviews, web pages, stray thoughts, scenes from one's one interviews. One of the writer's biggest challenges is how to find, gather, sift, save, and ultimately parse that material into bits and pieces with which to build the book. Good software can aid this task. But to succeed rather than go mad, you must choose and use your tools wisely — and create a workflow that helps you harness and shape your material in a way that complements your work and cognitive style. In this session, two experienced authors on the stage, and hopefully several more in the room, will describe how they've gone about this — their physical and software tools, their workflows, their work habits — with an emphasis on finding a smart path from raw material tosolid draft. We'll cover both Mac and PC tools. Then we'll see what the crowd uses.
Thursday January 19, 2012 11:15am - 12:15pm
Room 1c/d

11:15am

The special perils--and pleasures--of medical blogging
When Charlie Sheen spread his psyche across the web, Drew Pinsky and many others had no problem diagnosing him—a person they’d never met. The same thing happened with Jared Loughner--plenty of shrinks were happy to say what was wrong with him despite never having examined him, as were plenty of bloggers. Medical blogging is littered with traps that we can fall into—disease mongering, raising false hopes, violating patient privacy, and skirting around tricky ethical issues. At what point is it OK to discuss symptoms that could indicate mental disorder— and when does it do readers and affected people a disservice? When do efforts to destigmatize disease become advocacy and why do many affected people actually prefer medicalization to other labeling?
Thursday January 19, 2012 11:15am - 12:15pm
Room 7

11:15am

Basic Video Making 101: An online tutorial
This is a hands-on workshop where participants can begin to script and produce their own videos. Each video needs to tell a story. What are your objectives for the video you're making? What do you hope to accomplish? Just as we have clearly defined objectives and a "hidden curriculum" in the classroom, video production needs a set of decisions about level of presentation, lighting, dress, and setting that will affect how your audience reacts to your video. We will also work together to develop "best practices": what works, and what doesn't work, in online videos? Come prepared with your ideas and we will work together to turn them into ready-to-post videos.
Thursday January 19, 2012 11:15am - 12:15pm
Room 5

11:15am

Pimp your elevator pitch
For practising scientists: can you describe your research, clearly and accessibly, in two minutes? We plan to video about five volunteers doing their 'elevator pitch', then ask for feedback from the floor. Then the same five people do it again, and we compare the two (times five) videos. Hopefully this will be a worthwhile and engaging experiment for everybody who wants to engage with their family, the wider population, the departmental head, rich philanthropists...
Moderators
Thursday January 19, 2012 11:15am - 12:15pm
Room 4

11:15am

Science Scribe 2.0
Science Scribe 2.0 will be an introduction to visual note taking skills that can be used to augment and illuminate science stories. We will go over current examples of visual representations of science, learn techniques and practices for creating SketchNotes, and look at samples from the SketchNotes masters for tips on simple, clean ways to enhance science presentations. Participants will leave armed with a notebook, pens, and a new set of skills for visualizing science. Our goal for the conference is to crowd-source scribing- participants can volunteer to take SketchNotes for one or two presentations throughout the conference. We will then digitize these notes and feature them online as records of the conference and its contents.
Moderators
Thursday January 19, 2012 11:15am - 12:15pm
Room 6

12:15pm

Lunch
Grab a box lunch, find a friend and have a conversation.
Thursday January 19, 2012 12:15pm - 1:30pm
TBA

1:30pm

Going from blogging to MSM: selling out or gateway drug?
The rise of science blogging has ushered in a new generation of writers who have more experience with blogging than with writing for traditional publications. And when said writers start writing for MSM, they face a distinct set of challenges — technical, managerial, and philosophical. This session intends to be part how–to, and part a wider discussion about transitioning from the blogger mindset to more traditional journalism. What do bloggers bring to the table, and how do you market those skills? What are some of the pitfalls they face? As you spend more time working on ‘official’ writing projects, what happens to the blog and how does the space change? How do you cope with having less control over the words and presentation of your writing? How do you deal with getting pushed out of your comfort zone of expertise? How do you reconcile the two approaches and leave work without feeling like you've sacrificed a part of your soul? We plan to feature testimony from editors dealing with writers fresh-from-the-wordpress to get a sense of the other side of the table. Neither of us have significant freelance experience, so we invite freelancers to add to the discussion.
Thursday January 19, 2012 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Room 1c/d

1:30pm

Math Future network of communities: A year in review
The Math Future Interest Group is an international network of researchers, educators, families, community leaders and technology enablers. We are collaborating on a variety of research and development projects and conversation threads about social media as it relates to mathematics and mathematics education. In 2011, we opened a peer-to-peer School of the Mathematical Future in collaboration with P2PU; started to develop a community publishing process and a press called Delta Stream Media; launched Math Game Design group; held a successful crowd-funding campaign for "Moebius Noodles," a young math project; and organized our 100th open, free and interactive webinar in the ongoing series. http://mathfuture.wikispaces.com/
Moderators
Thursday January 19, 2012 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Room 3

1:30pm

Open Notebook Science
We will discuss the semantic representation of Open Lab Notebooks and automated discovery by social mapping of ONS content. An example of merging ONS datasets with "Dark Open Science Contributors" - companies and government agencies that will donate large amounts of data to the public domain - if they are asked - will be presented. (e.g.Alfa Aesar and EPA donate Open Melting Point data ). We will also discuss the variety of electronic platforms for ONS and how to apply them in undergraduate science lab courses.
Thursday January 19, 2012 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Room 8

1:30pm

The Uses of the Past: History of Science as a tool for Science Journalists/Writers
What does the history of science have to offer writers of stories concerned with contemporary results? A lot: context, for one; explanatory tools for another, (every complex modern science question/result has its roots in more accessible inquiries); bullsh*t detection; narrative...and so on. Historical knowledge and thinking like a historian help provide both specific material for stories and a technique for thinking about what to write and why.
Thursday January 19, 2012 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Room 7

1:30pm

Why Scientists Hate and Fear the Media; or, Science training for journalists
During last year's Death to Obfuscation workshop, tips & tricks came up for getting scientists to talk to journalists. But why do scientists have to be cajoled, lured, and begged to talk to journalists? And how can you as a journalist/writer avoid being a source of fear and loathing, and develop a positive relationship with scientists? Practicing scientists who've spent time in the communication trenches (Miriam on the "Great Pacific Garbage Patch", Craig on "Isopocalypse", and others in the room) will give the inside scoop about what scientists complain about behind closed doors, and how you as a journalist/writer can get beyond the apathy and hostility to amazing science stories.
Thursday January 19, 2012 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Room 4

1:30pm

Effective Research and Nature Photography
Using examples of good (and not-so-good) photos, this workshop will cover topics ranging from basic rules for effective composition, strategies for controlling light and eliminating distractions, and basic photo processing. The session will be appropriate for photographers with any level of expertise, but heavily geared towards casual and amateur photographers.
Thursday January 19, 2012 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Room 5

1:30pm

Filming and Communicating Your Research: Take your video production to the next level
So, you've got some equipment and some skills and are ready to embark on your scientific cinematic journey. We would like to help you take your ideas to the next level by discussing aspects of story development, pacing, and overall production value. We will discuss how editing can be used as a tool to solidify your story line, and we will discuss aspects of sample short films that do and do not work. Please come with your ideas for videos. In this workshop we will work with your ideas to create a plan that goes beyond a simple showcase of a certain concept or technique. We will discuss various options and brainstorm together to bring your production to the next level.
Thursday January 19, 2012 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Room 6

2:45pm

Blogging in the undergraduate science classroom (how to maximize the potential of course blogs)
This session will mainly feature a roundtable discussion of "best practices" for incorporating blogs into undergraduate courses. Possible topics that will be covered: Developing, evaluating, and grading assignments, incorporating blogs into syllabi, how blogging can contribute to learning goals, privacy versus openness, especially with respect to FERPA, and interacting with students with social media more broadly (e.g. twitter, G+, facebook, etc).
Thursday January 19, 2012 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Room 7

2:45pm

Harassing the Powerful for Fun and Profit: An Informal Investigative Reporters' Guide to Uncovering Secrets and Bypassing Flacks
This workshop will explain how to use the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and non-FOIA methods to find information that people don't want you to know, and how to pick topics and targets most likely to yield important insights. It will examine how to identify the officials and other sources most likely to provide assistance, and then how to get them to talk. It will explore how to investigate scientists and research efforts, and how to make use of the data you've received from government agencies. It won't really explain how to make much of a profit. But, if your idea of a good time is ruining an arrogant bureaucrat's day, you're in the right place.
Thursday January 19, 2012 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Room 6

2:45pm

Networking Beyond the Academy

So you've been at the bench for a decade and now you'd like to branch out. Is your passport in order? Do you speak the language? What is the exchange rate for academic currency? A discussion of transferable skills, cultural and linguistic differences, and navigating a different world. Topics of interest: staying abreast of happenings outside of the academy, using your network to find opportunities, figuring out how to be great once you get there.

Moderators
Thursday January 19, 2012 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Room 4

2:45pm

Sex, gender and controversy: writing to educate, writing to titillate
Everyone loves a duck penis (seriously! everyone!), but do audiences drawn to sexy topics actually learn about science? How can we blog these issues in a way that's more than just titillating? How can we use research on reproduction, sexuality and gender, and sexism and bias to promote interest in wider aspects of science? How much does the identity of the blogger matter? The identity of the audience? Join us for discussions of gender, sex, blogging, and... humping rats.
Thursday January 19, 2012 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Room 1c/d

2:45pm

The basic science behind the medical research: where to find it, how and when to use it
Sometimes, a medical story makes no sense without the context of the basic science--the molecules, cells, and processes that led to the medical results. At other times, inclusion of the basic science can simply enhance the story. How can science writers, especially without specific training in science, find, understand, and explain that context? As important, when should they use it? The answers to the second question can depend on publishing context, intent, and word count. This session will involve moderators with experience incorporating basic science information into medically based pieces with their insights into the whens and whys of using it. The session will also include specific examples of what the moderators and audience have found works and doesn't work from their own writing.
Thursday January 19, 2012 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Room 3

2:45pm

You Got Your Politics in My Science
Like it or not, anyone involved in communicating science will end up facing decisions about where the boundary lies between basic reporting and advocacy. Some scientific findings, like those surrounding the safety and efficacy of vaccination, call out for public education and political action. The U.S. government is the largest source of funding in many fields, which inextricably links science to policy decisions. And this year sees a U.S. presidential election in which there are stark differences in the acceptance of basic science between many candidates. Where is the boundary between informing about science--including its attendant politics--and advocating? When is advocacy appropriate? Is it even possible to avoid it? And how can staking out positions on issues unrelated to science (perhaps on Twitter or Facebook) influence how your professional work as a science communicator or scientist is perceived?
Thursday January 19, 2012 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Room 8

2:45pm

Podcasting for Beginners
Experienced podcasters Ginger Campbell (the Brain Science Podcast) and Alok Jha (Science Weekly) will lead this session for everyone who is interested in creating audio content with a focus on podcasting. This is a practical "nuts and bolts" session aimed at beginners, but it is also an opportunity for all podcasters to share questions, tips, and advice.
Thursday January 19, 2012 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Room 5

4:00pm

Covering Political Neuroscience in the Blogosphere
Recent research suggests that liberals and conservatives differ, in a measurable way, in brain structure and function. Yeah. Think about that. This work is far from phrenology, but interpreting its meaning is difficult and contentious. And indeed, given the massively controversial nature of this research, how can science bloggers contribute measure and sanity to the discussion of it? What caveats are necessary? What declarations are supportable? For it is not like this work is going away. Rather, we can expect more and more of these types of studies—of political phenotypes, of bio-politics—to emerge.
Thursday January 19, 2012 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 8

4:00pm

Know Your Digital Rights!
When you click "publish," what rights have you gained, forfeited or abused? As more bloggers fall under the umbrella of mainstream media organizations, and traditional journalists increasingly navigate uncertain digital waters, all shades of contributors should know their legal safe zones — and good netiquette. In this session, we'll cover the legalities and formalities of photo use, re-blogging, aggregating, excerpting, contracts and more, including some rare but dreaded missteps that may end in a lawsuit. We'll present case studies and advice from legal pros and writers who have been through the ringer so that #Scio12 attendees might understand their rights and navigate future endeavors with more ease, better pay and peace of mind.
Thursday January 19, 2012 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 3

4:00pm

So You Want To Make A Science Documentary
This workshop is aimed at those who want to take the next step into storytelling with moving images or sound in work that moves past straight news, commentary or illustration into documentary. It will be half practical, focusing on production much more than technical crafts, which is to say it will talk about how to organize a documentary project down to a quite nitty-gritty level more than how to use a camera or which microphone to buy. (Though some of that kind of stuff will, no doubt, slip in.) The other half of the workshop will look at/listen to a couple of short, well made science documentaries, including recent student work, to start the discussion on what the particular challenges and opportunities for telling stories the media of audio or video create.
Moderators
Thursday January 19, 2012 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 6

4:00pm

The Limits of Transparency: Self-Censorship in Physician Writers
This session is about more than HIPAA violations. Being a physician or a physician-in-training involves loyalties on a number of levels. We have moral obligations to ourselves, to our patients, to our colleagues, and to the community at large. Sometimes, what we want to say on behalf of one group conflicts with the interests of the others. When writing, we don't get to choose our audience; the words are open to all. How can we say something meaningful that serves a community's greater interest without compromising our professional loyalties or damaging our reputation among our medical peers? Or, how can we reflect upon the profession in a constructive way that doesn't alienate the public or further erode the trust between patients and their doctors? Medicine is a tight-knit community where--like it or not--reputation matters and self-policing reigns supreme. Criticism is not always received well, even if it's kept internal. If information is broadcast to those outside the profession, the author can be perceived as anything from less-than-serious to a liability to the profession's image. (Neurologist and best-selling author Oliver Sacks has been criticized as "a much better writer than he is a clinician" and "the man who mistook his patients for a literary career.") There is currently only vague policy and precedent with regard to social media and blogging. "Use common sense" seems to be the theme, but, as we've increasingly witnessed, the boundaries of that "sense" vary widely among physician writers. What kind of balance can be struck to write substantially, professionally, and honestly?
Thursday January 19, 2012 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 7

4:00pm

The Punchlines and Perils of Science Humor
“What can I get you?” the bartender asks. A tachyon walks into a bar. And so on. Well-executed touches of humor can help make science writing more expressive, personal, and memorable. Badly executed humor can induce eye-rolling, embarrassment, and retreats for the nearest exit. This session will focus on doing the latter. —Eh, maybe not, but we’re setting the bar low. We will in fact discuss how to find the humor hiding inside science stories and how to present it to good effect to various audiences. How can analogies and metaphors, anecdotes, and other storytelling devices help to bring the science alive? How can you express your humanity and curiosity through the humor without becoming that guy who tries too hard? Brian Malow (@sciencecomedian) will draw on his extensive experience for this discussion while John Rennie (@tvjrennie) holds his coat. Everyone is encouraged to bring, share, and discuss their own favorite examples of analogies, metaphors and other humorous devices (rhetorical, not electrical!) useful for conveying scientific points.
Thursday January 19, 2012 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 1c/d

4:00pm

Undergraduate Education: Collaborating to Create the Next Generation of Open Scientists
Science faculty and librarians can collaborate on many aspects of undergraduate education - two ideas are the focus of this discussion. First: How can we best help undergrads understand and explore the scholarly information landscape? In addition to formal sources like journal articles, informal sources (e.g., blogs) are of increasing importance/relevance, which raises a question: How do we get students to think about what formal and informal really mean? How do we - faculty, librarians and others - work together to teach students to navigate the disciplinary landscape and become productive and critical consumers of - and contributors to - the disciplinary conversation? Second: How do we introduce students to the great big wide world of open science? How do the various players in higher education communicate to the next generation the incredible depth and complexity of what going on out there? How do we raise (inspire? support?) the next generation of Cameron Neylons, Steve Koches and Jean-Claude Bradleys (not to mention the next generation of Dorothea Salos and Christina Pikases)?
Thursday January 19, 2012 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 4

4:00pm

Data visualization
With the latest Web-based tools, turning numbers into art doesn't require a degree in computer science. Join this hands-on workshop to explore how to use data to report and tell stories visually using the latest tools, such as Google Fusion tables, to create data visualizations. Participants will break into groups and visualize a provided data set, while workshop leaders circulate to answer questions and give feedback and tips on best practices and design. What to bring: laptops with power supply.
Moderators
Thursday January 19, 2012 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 5

6:00pm

Reception at the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, with a tour of the Nature Research Center

Buses will take us from the McKimmon Center to the hotels, where we'll get 30 minutes to drop computers, freshen up and get back on the bus.

At the museum, enjoy food and drink (Kentucky Ale donated from Alltech) while you wander the exhibits. A welcome by Meg Lowman -- our inspiring ScienceOnline2011 banquet speaker -- and a short talk by NYTimes reporter Andy Revkin will take place in the main auditorium.

We'll also get tours of the still-under-construction Nature Research Center:

Be sure to get a ticket that has the time of your tour when you first enter the museum. The tours will start at 6:45 and continue every 15 minutes. The last tours will start at 8:45. They will last approximately 20 minutes. 

Hard hats are not required, but everyone going on a tour needs closed-toed shoes with no heel, and no baggy clothing. Safety is a priority.

Please share your experience through tweets, photos and blog posts. Our own David Kroll is now the science communications director here and we're looking forward to great things from the NRC.

Buses will be available at 9:30pm to return to the hotels. Otherwise, head out into downtown Raleigh to grab dinner or a drink, or join the open-mic Talent Show.

Moderators
DK

David Kroll

Director of Science Communication
ML

Meg Lowman, PhD

Director, Nature Research Center, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
AR

Andy Revkin

journalist and author

Thursday January 19, 2012 6:00pm - 9:00pm
N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences (11 West Jones St.  Raleigh, NC 27601)

8:30pm

 
Friday, January 20
 

8:00am

Morning check in

Arrive early, fill up on coffee and breakfast, and continue your conversations from where you left off last night.

Breakfast items include bagels with cream cheese and jam, assorted muffins, yogurt and fresh fruit. Breakfast, coffee and tea will be served in Room 1a/b.

Friday January 20, 2012 8:00am - 9:30am
McKimmon Conference Ctner (1101 Gorman St., Raleigh, NC 27606)

9:30am

Citizens, experts, and science
This session hopes to explore the “third wave of science” or “democratizing science” as we move beyond recognizing trained scientists as the sole source of authoritative, objective expertise. We will discuss some examples of how citizens can get involved in the scientific process – both in terms of where in the process (idea generation through analysis) and how (web access, in the field, etc.). Finally, we will cover what ethical questions must be addressed as this movement towards participatory science broadens.
- use of the web as a citizen science tool for data collection and beyond
- including citizens in the scientific process from idea generation to analysis and outreach
- ethics (who gets credit/authorship, where do you publish, etc.)
- Academic rewards for participating in participatory science
- conversations on blogs as early review
- who qualifies as an "expert" and what criteria do we use
Friday January 20, 2012 9:30am - 10:30am
Room 4

9:30am

Do press officers/public information officers need journalists any more?

With the plethora of tools available to press officers/public information officers for direct-to-audience communication, how much is the intermediary of the mainstream press required? What kinds of formats and players are taking the place of mainstream press? How are press officers/PIOs using these tools effectively to both communicate messages and engage in substantive dialog with their stakeholders and audiences? The session is intended to not only assess where we are now but to futurecast the direction of this kind of work

Friday January 20, 2012 9:30am - 10:30am
Room 6

9:30am

How do we teach science journalism in the era of social media?
or those of us trying to train next-gen science writers and bloggers, what do we teach them? Tools and tricks--and let them figure out how to use them? Intellectual examination of the history and nature of journalism, and let the students learn the tricks and tools on the job? Law schools teach deep academic content, and let employers teach the grads how to be lawyers. Journalism schools have traditionally taught writing and reporting skills. Medical schools are in the middle--study of science, and instruction in skills. Where should science journalism pedagogy be, with the media landscape changing as quickly as it is? To what breaches do we once more unto? If we insist on teaching John McPhee, are we fighting the last war? Or is now the moment to stand fast in defense of timeless storytelling?
Friday January 20, 2012 9:30am - 10:30am
Room 7

9:30am

Is encouraging scientific literacy more than telling people what they need to know?
The idea of scientific literacy is a sometimes maligned idea, one that too often focuses on which scientific ideas the public doesn’t understand. But what happens when we think about it differently? What if scientific literacy is a fluid concept that lets us consider the skills and contextual understandings that people need to really engage with science, in the media and in their everyday lives? What does this kind of literacy mean for online science? This session will explore the scientific literacy skills and understandings that help people understand and engage with complex scientific controversies where simple scientific facts are not enough (such as the recent neutrino results). It will also ask how writers and bloggers can engage and encourage those skills and understandings in their reading community and how science education and outreach efforts can reflect this view of scientific literacy.
Friday January 20, 2012 9:30am - 10:30am
Room 8

9:30am

Science Podcasting: Pros and Cons
esiree Schell (host of Skeptically Speaking) and Julia Galef (co-host of Rationally Speaking) both host successful podcasts that inform and entertain the science-loving public. They'll lead a discussion on the creative ways that science communicators of all types can get their message out via podcast. Topics include: finding your voice, reaching your audience, involving bloggers and non-blogging scientists, and helping experts make the topics accessible and engaging to laypeople.
Friday January 20, 2012 9:30am - 10:30am
Room 3

9:30am

Using altmetrics tools to track the online impact of your research
We will briefly introduce the field of altmetrics, present the outcomes of an analysis performed especially for Science Online and then demo tools including ScienceCard , altmetric.com , and Total Impact . We will finish with a discussion of how these metrics might be used as alternatives and supplements to citation-based approaches.
Friday January 20, 2012 9:30am - 10:30am
Room 5

9:30am

On the record - a media-skills workshop for scientists
This practical workshop will cover why media work is important, how to gain confidence, how to defend yourself against misquoting, and how to deal with interviews in a variety of media - phone, TV and radio; live and pre-recorded. It will be run by a massive raft of seasoned spokespeople and journalists. We will hope to give delegates practice by matching them up in pairs or small groups with journalists for mock interviews. The journalists may or may not be pretending to be evil.
Friday January 20, 2012 9:30am - 10:30am
Room 1c/d

10:45am

Blogging Science While Female
The session on women in science blogging at Science Online 2011 sparked internet-wide discussion about sexism, discrimination and gender representation in science and science blogging. Now here we are, a year later. How have we, as a community, faced the issues brought up by last year's discussion? What has changed? What have we learned, and what challenges still lie ahead? Moderators and attendees will assess the current state of women in the science blogosphere and discuss the best way we can support and encourage gender representation in science blogging.
Friday January 20, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
Room 8

10:45am

Making Book on E-books: How to write a science or medical e-book and publish and sell it online

The emphasis in this session will be on practical steps for science writers who understand that electronic publishing has turned the book world upside down and who want to take charge of preparing their books and bringing them into the world online.

Participating will be science writers who have done eBooks and science writers who want to do them. Topics will include eBook basics, reasons to choose eBooks over traditional publishing, the new outlets for long-form writing that is not-quite-a-book, DIY v. publishing services, deciding how much help you need, and other topics you suggest.

We'd also like to begin figuring out if the Science Online community can build a supportive network for eBooks similar to networks that foster genre books such as scifi, mystery, and romance.

Friday January 20, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
Room 7

10:45am

Scientists and Wikipedia

This session will discuss ideas and projects to bridge the gap between Wikipedia and higher education/research. The APS Wikipedia Initiative (APSWI) wants to ensure that the psychological science presented in Wikipedia is accurate and up to date. Instead of writing a literature review, students (undergraduates) in a 200-level lecture course paired up to improve Wikipedia articles on various topics in cognitive psychology. Discussion topics could include: creating and managing the assignment; pros and cons of Wikipedia editing compared to traditional college paper writing; the value of engaging undergraduates in public scholarship as a form of civic engagement. The second part of this session will discuss opportunities and incentives for expert participation in Wikipedia. How to get researchers to curate and review Wikipedia articles on scientific topics, contribute references or semantic metadata? How can Wikipedia better support higher education and scholarly communication?

Friday January 20, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
Room 6

10:45am

Teaching Core Competencies in Science: Solving Algebraic and Word Problems
From classroom blogging, to blogging at Nature, these students had quite a year! They'd like to start by talking about their experience with blogging so far, what they've learned, where they've had problems, and where they've been successful. Then, they want to get ideas from the audience on how to start a 1 day conference in NYC for middle/high school students interested in blogging.
Friday January 20, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
Room 3

10:45am

The Next Generation of Bloggers
From classroom blogging, to blogging at Nature, these students had quite a year! They'd like to start by talking about their experience with blogging so far, what they've learned, where they've had problems, and where they've been successful. Then, they want to get ideas from the audience on how to start a 1 day conference in NYC for middle/high school students interested in blogging.
Moderators
Friday January 20, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
Room 1c/d

10:45am

The Semantic Web
Semantic Web-based projects are becoming increasingly more popular across a wide variety of disciplines. The session will provide a basic introduction to the topic and highlight different perspectives from people working in this space. We'll show *why* this technology is being used in so many areas – and demonstrate the benefits of linked data (especially in areas related to data reuse for visualizations, research discovery, and more). Open PHACTS, VIVO, and a number of the open government initiatives are good examples and there are many others. This session can serve as an introduction to the concept and highlight interesting and different ways that this technology is being used successfully.
Friday January 20, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
Room 5

10:45am

Understanding audiences and how to know when you are *really* reaching out
Who is your audience? Do you write for anyone who will listen or do you target specific groups? How do you know you are reaching anyone? How do you address audience ignorance without making your audience feel ignorant? This session will explore taking a science communication pluralism approach to maximize the number of audiences we can reach. Some writers want to reach other scientists or professionals in their fields, some view their online activities as "broader impact" or outreach, while others write for publishing outlets and others write for whoever pays attention! Audiences are segregated by age class, geography, career, background knowledge and other random interests and often use widely different social networks for finding, aggregating an sharing content. How can we manage the balance of voice, scientific accuracy and tailoring content to appeal to a wider variety of audiences? How can we best communicate to different audiences without making anyone feel either ignorant or bored? Let's discuss how science writers craft their content to cater to more than one audience, how they can address lack of basic background knowledge, how social networking is utilized and can be further harnessed and whether social media (and which types) make any difference in pimping your content out for a broader reach. What are the appropriate metrics to measure impact across a diverse array of audiences and more importantly what metrics do we need that are currently not available or accessible on freely available web stats software?
Friday January 20, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
Room 4

12:00pm

Broadening the Participation of Underrepresented Populations in Online Science Communication and Communities
How are you using your skills in online communication to engage students and/or fellow scientists from underrepresented groups? How do you feel about the unusual digital divide: while texting is used more by underrepresented groups, does that compromise writing skills? How can non-minority allies cultivate and retain minority students into the sciences? Are credibility and authenticity necessary for mentoring minorities? Women scientist bloggers have been increasingly successful in creating a supportive online community that addresses their needs - what are the challenges for scientist-bloggers from underrepresented groups? More generally, and in the spirit of Dr. King, how has the web been used for nonviolent protesting and influencing culture?
Moderators
Friday January 20, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 7

12:00pm

I can haz context?
There's a lot of talk about the need for more context in science journalism, to depict science as a fluid process rather than fixating on the latest paper-of-the-day. Vigorous nodding ensues. But how do we actually achieve this, how does this work for different media (print, blogs etc), what types of context are actually useful, how do journalists balance time and depth, how can we use the tools of the internet to provide context, and how can context in science writing actually help science itself?
Friday January 20, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 1c/d

12:00pm

Science Communication, Risk Communication, and the role of Social Networks
As important as it is for science communicators to provide clear, relevant, accurate information, people’s views about climate change or vaccines or genetically modified food or chemicals or nuclear power, or so many other health and safety issues, are a blend of conscious reasoning about the factual evidence, and subconscious emotional interpretation of that evidence. The subjective nature of risk perception, which shapes the choices people make as individuals and together as a society, raises unique challenges and ethical issues for science communicators. At a time of rising science denialism, as researchers in Italy face manslaughter charges for how they handled risk communication around the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake, with the debate about climate change raging, this is a critically important issue. Topics to explore include: Why do people’s fears so often not match the evidence? What is the ethical obligation of science communication about risk? What is the latest research on risk perception? How can we integrate this research into science communication training? How does social media amplify or attenuate perceived risk?
Moderators
Friday January 20, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 4

12:00pm

The Sound of Science
Science is most often communicated visually. We all remember the flow charts, there are beautiful field guide illustrations, and sometimes you just need a good diagram. But look over there in the corner, where poor little sound is sitting, just waiting for you to recognize its potential. This session would explain why, and how, you should use sound to explain science. We'd look at ways in which sound can enhance your story. Whether it's the voice of the researcher, or just the sound that the stuff you're talking about makes, there's something to be said for hearing a story. And this doesn't require Radiolab-style production (we can't all be MacArthur geniuses after all). A simple sound, embedded into your story, can turn things up to 11. The session will explore what kinds of stories are worth "soundifying", look at some good examples of sounds within stories, and talk about how to embed sound into your work in an easy, sensical way.
Moderators
Friday January 20, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 3

12:00pm

Making Beautiful Maps
Maps are a wonderful way to convey geographic information, but making them can seem like an intimidating task. In this session, we'll run through freely available GIS software, how to use it, and how to beautify the maps that they produce. For those looking to make even simpler maps, we'll also run through where to find free image files that can be easily color coded with free software. It's a straightforward and simple way without having to dive into GIS. The session will start with demos and lead to a discussion/Q&A about cartography and the role of maps in science writing. This session will be aimed at anyone interested in maps or geographic information.
Moderators
Friday January 20, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 5

12:00pm

The Attention Economy: The currencies for social media influence and exchange rates for attention
In this session we’ll look at the various tools that claim to measure user influence on across social networks and discuss some of the issues and etiquette around how you can increase your influence. Using screenshot walkthroughs, we will describe briefly the currently available influence metrics and look to analyze the values and shortfalls of each one. Also, we’ll examine some recent studies that look at network growth on Twitter and aim to start a discussion on the etiquette aspects of social media influence. What role do reciprocity (e.g. #followback) and attentional rewards (e.g. listing, favouriting, public shout-outs such as awarding K+ or #ff) play in personal network development? Are there other “soft” ways to increase your influence?
Friday January 20, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 8

12:00pm

Working Group: What to do when you're the go-to online outreach person at your institution: guidelines from the Science Online group
When someone comes to you and says, "So I want to get into this internets things," what do you tell them? Best practices? Lessons learned? This information is scattered over the blogosphere to some degree, so this working group will gather it up, incorporate new suggestions, and create a document for newcomers to online science communication. In addition to best practices, we will try to provide scientists with a "layman's guide to social media," including what outlets are good for what kind of information, the most popular and informative tools, and how to manage them all.
Friday January 20, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 6

1:00pm

BOX LUNCH
Friday January 20, 2012 1:00pm - 2:00pm
TBA

2:00pm

Techno Blitz Demos: Blogs & Science Communication

2:00-2:15pm - Journalists don’t know best – creating a “mutualised” newspaper website - Alokh Jha
At the Guardian we are experimenting with several ways of embracing the more open and transparent way of doing journalism through “mutualisation” – the process of encouraging collaboration between journalist and reader. The approach recognises that organisations and individuals all now have the capability to be online publishers. Institutions, NGOs, governments, scientists, bloggers and many others can all contribute to stories in ways that were not possible with print. I will outline a few of these experiments including our efforts to cover science stories using live blogs and story trackers. These follow news events in real time over hours or days using a combination of traditional reporting plus curated (and linked) content from the wider web. I will also present our open news list which we set up in October 2011. This lays out publicly the selection of stories we plan to cover in advance (something that in the past many news editors would have regarded as virtually suicidal) and encourages feedback from readers.

2:15-2:30pm - Multimedia for Science Communicators: What do you want to learn? - Kelly Izlar and Jay Heinz
How about a solid introduction to video shooting and editing, graphics and animation, data visualization and posting to the web in five days? The Morehead Planetarium and Science Center is joining forces with the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to put together just such a program. But we need your suggestions. We¹ve held general multimedia how-to bootcamps for years, but we want to tweak this new one specifically for science communicators. So we¹re hosting an open discussion about what science communicators need to learn in order to transform them into multimedia ninjas. We are in pursuit of an effective, efficient program to help convey science in the digital age.

2:30-2:45pm - Break

2:45-3:00pm - North Carolina Health News - experiments in local media - Rose Hoban
This business model for journalism is changing. Traditional papers are laying off reporters, and journalism entrepreneurs are experimenting on the web. But the challenge is making a living! North Carolina Health News is a local news service dedicated to keeping people in North Carolina informed about health care in the state, and is looking to experiment. We're about to launch, and we'd love to hear what you have to say about the best local news sites you've encountered.

3:00-3:15pm - The MarcoPolo Project: funding Research with Blogs - Enrico Balli
In August and October 2011 the group of scientists, journalists and media representatives who participated in MarcoPolo2010 have traveled through Armenia and the Crimea to continue collecting data along the Silk Road. Just as they did on the previous expedition in 2010, the travelers have met representatives from the Terra Madre communities and collected DNA samples to explore the links between genetics, food preference and culinary traditions. http://www.marcopolo2011.it is the blog that could fund the research project, collecting money from many organizations and companies that were interested in sponsoring the dissemination project. The project will continue in 2012, completing the genetic path along the Silk Road.

3:15-3:30pm - Break

3:30-3:45pm - Developing a communication mix to build and engage an online community - Rob Thomas
Robert Thomas from the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research, in Australia discusses the challenges of developing and maintaining an online presence in a media rich environment. Citing the public awareness and community engagement work of the National Enabling Technologies Strategy, examples will include the effective use of Facebook groups, YouTube, and Twitter to gain and maintain the public’s interest in science communication activities.

3:45-4:00pm - EVOLUTION:THIS VIEW OF LIFE, a Medium for Communicating Evolutionary Science to the General Public - Robert Kadar
Expanding evolutionary science beyond the biological sciences is one of the most important intellectual developments of the 21st century. EVOLUTION:THIS VIEW OF LIFE will catalyze the rate of the expansion at the high end of the intellectual spectrum in addition to serving as a medium of communication for the general public. The reason that the general public accepts physics and chemistry more than evolution is not because they are better supported by facts, but because they are so eminently useful in everyday life. Once evolution is portrayed as a practical toolkit for understanding and improving the human condition, it will be accepted just as easily. EVOLUTION:THIS VIEW OF LIFE will catalyze the transformation of public understanding about evolution, in the same way that EvoS (Evolutionary Studies Program) and the Evolution Institute are catalyzing the transformation for higher education and public policy formulation.

4:00-4:15pm - The Rise of Cinematic Journalism and The Atavist - Olivia Koski
The Atavist started out as an idea at a bar. A couple of friends wondered how to rejuvenate the tradition of great longform writing amidst the crisis in print media. So writer Evan Ratliff, web designer Jefferson Rabb, and editor Nicholas Thompson decided to make an app. A year later, the Atavist has published a dozen enhanced stories, sold on a variety of platforms. Fusing text with imagery, video, maps, audio and timelines, it's the invention of an entirely new form of storytelling. Come learn how the software behind the Atavist works, and join the digital longform revolution.

4:15-4:30pm - The new Science section at Huffington Post - Cara Santa Maria
Cara Santa Maria, Science Correspondent for The Huffington Post ("HuffPost"), will introduce the site's newest section: HuffPost Science, which combines comprehensive coverage of science with HuffPost's singular blend of real-time news and analysis, community engagement in real-time, and leading edge social tools. HuffPost Science is meant to encourage a deeper understanding of the natural world and how it works, covering scientists, academics and thinkers, the latest discoveries and approaches, and more. The site is meant as a dynamic hub for all things science, a starting point for conversations about what we know -- as well as what we don't know. HuffPost Science covers the breadth of what's happening in science, and explores every day phenomena through the lens of science, whether it's studying Mariano Rivera's wicked fastball, the latest developments in longevity, or the science of love, sex, and spirituality.

4:30-4:45pm - Break

4:45-5:00pm - Mathblogging.org - Peter Krautzberger
Mathblogging.org started out as a copy-cat of http://scienceblogging.com but with a focus on the small niche that is mathematical blogging. The project is now little over a year old and has slowly grown in terms of its database and functionality. In this process we moved away from mimicry to ideas that serve the mathematical community better, such as supporting other projects like mathoverflow.net.
Techno Blitz presentations will happen on Friday afternoon, from 2pm till 5pm in rooms 7 and 8 at McKimmon Center. This is a preliminary schedule.

Friday January 20, 2012 2:00pm - 4:45pm
Room 3

2:00pm

Techno Blitz Demos: Credit, Identity & Making Science Available

2:00-2:15pm - Get credit for all of your research - Mark Hahnel, FigShare
FigShare is a open data project that allows researchers to publish their data in a citable, searchable and sharable manner. The data can come in the form of individual figures, datasets or video files and users are encouraged to share their negative data and unpublished results too. All data is persistently stored online under the most liberal Creative Commons license, waiving copyright where possible. This allows scientists to access and share the information from anywhere in the world with minimal friction. This demo will walk you through how to use the tool, and what's planned for the future. Come see how FigShare has grown from a seed of an idea at #scio11 to a full-fledged project supported by Digital Science. For more, visit http://FigShare.com

2:15-2:30pm - Writing for Robots: Getting your research noticed in the algorithmic era - William Gunn, Mendeley
With the volume of research output always rising, it's very hard to stay on top of what you need to read. Practically no one finds research articles anymore by going to the journal first and reading the table of contents. We all depend to some degree on algorithms to help us find what we should know. I'd like to talk a little about how some of the major algorithms work, how knowledge of the algorithms can make you a better writer, and how search and recommendation work together to bring you just the right paper at the right time. I'll present some specific examples of situations where these principles can be applied in three phases of research - starting a project, actively doing research, and writing up your results.

2:30-2:45pm - ORCID - Martin Fenner
Open Researcher & Contributor ID (ORCID) was incorporated as an independent, non-profit organization in 2010 to solve the name ambiguity problem in scholarly research and communication by establishing a global, open registry to provide persistent, unique identifiers for researchers (http://www.orcid.org/). The ORCID service will launch in 2012. ORCID will facilitate the attribution of scholarly contributions that go beyond journal articles, e.g. datasets, peer review, blogging, or microattributions. The presentation will introduce ORCID to the audience, and will discuss several interesting scenarios using ORCID identifiers in scholarly communication.

2:45-3:00pm - Break

3:00-3:15pm - Research Discovery: Finding Networking Nirvana on the Semantic Web - Kristi Holmes
VIVO is an open source, open ontology research discovery platform for hosting information about scientists and their interests, activities, and accomplishments. The rich data in VIVO can be repurposed and shared to highlight expertise and facilitate discovery at many levels. Across implementations, VIVO provides a uniform semantic structure to enable a new class of tools which can use the rich data to advance science. There are currently over 50 VIVO implementations in the United States and over 20 international VIVO projects. This presentation will provide a brief description of VIVO and will demonstrate how diverse groups are not only using VIVO, but are also developing apps to consume the semantically-rich data for visualizations, enhanced multi-site search, discovery, and more. Learn more at http://vivoweb.org.

3:15-3:30pm - Article-Level Metrics (ALM) at PLoS - Jennifer Lin
PLoS launched Article-Level Metrics (ALM) to provide a more meaningful and granular understanding of the importance and reach of a piece of research work. The digital environment of today’s research enables far more modes of dissemination and, subsequently, the collection and analysis of these conduits than ever before, offering new and interesting ways to understand impact. ALM captures the reach of research dissemination across online usage, citations, social bookmarks, notes, comments, ratings and blog coverage. With this suite of data, the entire academic community can assess the value of articles after publication. A free, open-source ALM application is available for the public to build third party applications. Also, the ALM API makes the data available for anyone to re-use and mash-up. This presentation will exhibit features and tools for using ALMs in research discovery (filtering, aggregating, and navigating the research of others) as well as professional advancement (tracking, benchmarking, and evaluating one's own research). It will describe the value of ALMs for scientific researchers, funding agencies, academic institutions, and governmental organizations. For more information, please visit: http://article-level-metrics.plos.org/.

3:30-3:45pm - Break

3:45-4:00pm - PaperCritic - Jason Priem (on behalf of Martin Bachwerk)
In a world where our lives are broadcast by Facebook and Twitter, our news consumption is dominated by blogs and our knowledge is defined by Wikipedia articles, science somehow remains 20 years behind in terms of communicating about its advances. PaperCritic aims to improve the situation by offering researchers a way of monitoring all types of feedback about their scientific work, as well as allowing everyone to easily review the work of others, in a fully open and transparent environment. The demo will give an overview of the site's main functions as well as discuss some plans for the future. Feel welcome to visit http://www.papercritic.com in the meantime to check it out for yourself.

4:00-4:15pm - Annotum, an open source, open access scholarly authoring and publishing system based on WordPress. - Carl Leubsdorf
The process of authoring, reviewing, and publishing scholarly articles remains an expensive, time-consuming process that can require significant up-front investment and technical expertise. Coupled with lengthy review processes this can create delays of up to a year before new scientific findings are published. Annotum, a new, open-source, open-access authoring publishing platform based on WordPress, provides an easy-to use alternative to existing publishing systems that supports very rapid expert review and professional online publishing.
In this live demonstration, we will show how Annotum can be used by scholarly authors to collaboratively author articles with rich text formatting, structured figures and equations, and citations. Then we'll show how authors can submit their article to a peer-review process, demonstrate the review and approval workflow, and publish the approved article online as well as in PDF and NLM-compatible XML formats. And did we mention that Annotum is completely free and open source, and available for free on WordPress.com?
Annotum is a product of Solvitor LLC with heavy lifting by Crowd Favorite. Annotum is free (speech and beer).

4:15-4:30pm - Break

4:30-4:45pm - REACH NC - Sharlini Sankaran
Leaders from UNC General Administration, NC State University, UNC Chapel Hill, Duke University, and the Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) have partnered with Elsevier to create REACH NC (Research, Engagement And Capabilities Hub of North Carolina), a portal to access information on the expertise of university personnel - www.reachnc.org . REACH NC users can search for and view the expertise profiles of individuals or entire units. Profiles are generated using publications, sponsored research awards, intellectual property, and course descriptions. Expertise profiles are built upon institutional or publicly available data and generally require minimal upkeep by individuals. Whether building new collaborations, attracting and retaining businesses to North Carolina, or enhancing the effectiveness and competitiveness of other NC institutions, REACH NC is positioned to help, with information about and access to potential collaborators in research, problem solving, and economic development.

4:45-5:00pm - Get Visible or Vanish: Digital Publishing for Science Professionals – Courtney Enzor
In today’s digital age, "publish or perish" has become "get visible or vanish." How do you build this critical visibility the right way without undermining traditional academic and publishing opportunities? Building visibility is more than just posting on a WordPress blog and waiting for people to find you; i…

Friday January 20, 2012 2:00pm - 4:45pm
Room 7

2:00pm

Techno Blitz Demos: Tools & Projects - Doing Science!

2:00-2:15pm - The Scientists with Stories Project: a media training collaboration for Duke-UNC PhD students - Clare Fieseler
Science communication is an increasingly important component of the broader impact of scientific research projects -- and the grants that fund them. Yet, most science curricula at the PhD level lack formal programs to help young scientists develop the skills needed to communicate via newly dominant mediums of digital communication. This session will describe a new 1-year pilot project between the UNC and Duke marine laboratories. The project’s goal is to provide media training and exhibit platforms for PhD students. Student project leaders welcome discussion on how to create an effective interuniversity program that could secure the project’s survival past the pilot year 

2:15-2:30pm - Booles' Rings - Peter Krautzberger
At first sight, it may appear that Booles' Rings is yet-another-blogging-network, running a WordPress multisite installation to host a couple of sites. However, the goal of Booles' Rings is to change the way mathematicians (and other researchers) use their academic homepages: we are developing best practices for using a modern website technology to present and connect our online presences as researchers in the fullest sense. Using WordPress and other open-source tools we incorporate aspects of decentralized social networks hoping to bring the scientific community a tiny step forward towards being an actual community of people: in control of their content and making connections and interactions with other researchers transparent and visible beyond publication metrics. I will demonstrate the features of and ideas for our very young project (beyond the well-known WordPress features) focusing on the potential of WordPress and other decentralized social networking tools.

2:30-2:45pm - Measuring the Ocean Online- Rachel Weidinger and Kieran Mulvaney
How does the ocean measure up in social media? For the first time, aggregate, issue-level benchmarking analysis will be available. A new team will present findings-- including content analysis, keyword trends, and possibly sentiment and influencer analysis-- from project underway to lay down a baseline on the state of ocean conservation conversations on the social web. The goal of the yet unnamed project is to help science-based ocean content providers reach wider audiences with greater impact. Though it'll focus on ocean issues, the benchmarking pattern may be of use in related disciplines.

2:45-3:00pm - Mapping, knowledge sharing, and citizen science on the web using CartoDB - Andrew Hill
CartoDB (http://www.cartodb.com) is an open source, geospatial database on the web that provides storage, simple APIs, and mapping. Using components of CartoDB, we have helped develop a variety of science tools on the web from citizen science projects like OldWeather (http://oldweather.org/) and NEEMO (http://neemo.zooniverse.org/), to knowledge sharing projects like Protected Planet (http://protectedplanet.net/), and science support tools like GeoCAT (http://rlat.kew.org/). Now we would like to share some of CartoDB capabilities as well as discuss some of the lessons we have learned building science tools on the web.

3:00-3:15pm -Break

3:15-3:30pm -  OpenHelix Online Apps: Connecting Researchers, Research, Resources and Data - Jennifer Williams
In this session I will discuss online apps for connecting research publications to research data. These apps are designed by OpenHelix in collaboration with publishers such as BioMed Centraland Elsevier that extend the information ecosystem, and function to connect bioscience resources mentioned in journal articles to the actual databases and to training on their usage, and also help readers extract and extend their understanding more easily. I will touch on apps for and on BioMed Central, and for the SciVerse platform from Elsevier, which help researchers access OpenHelix tutorials, as well as data at OMIMReactome, and SMART databases.

3:30-3:45pm - Experimonth: One citizen, one scientist, one month at a time - Beck Tench
Experimonth (http://experimonth.lifeandscience.org) is a month-long participatory project that connects citizens, scientists and artists through blogging. From its humble beginnings as food experiments between museum co-workers, hear how this project has evolved to an NSF-funded model for engaging people in using science as a way of knowing about their world. Also learn how we're measuring the project through discourse analysis and how we're expanding it to face-to-face events and exhibits at the Museum of Life and Science in Durham, NC.

3:45-4:00pm - Cachalot: A Scalable, Open Access Digital Textbook for Marine Science - David Johnston
The Digital Sea Monsters Project at Duke University recently developed a digital textbook – called Cachalot - for courses focusing on Marine Megafauna. This textbook integrates the use of text-based, photo, video and audio teaching materials and delivers them to students in a freely downloadable application optimized for the Apple iPad. Cachalot represents a new form of digital textbook, one that is completely open access and populated with current content written by experts in the field. As a textbook, Cachalot sits at the intersection of transformative philosophy (e.g. it is open access and crowd-sourced), pedagogy (e.g. it provides for location independent and just-in-time learning that can fully exploit multimedia) and technology (exploits hand-held devices that integrate computational, communication and visualization capabilities). The app integrates open access journal articles, textbook-style content (including great photos and illustrations), video, audio and animations of animal behavior and anatomy within an annotation interface. Cachalot provides direct access to the experts that contribute to it, and the app incorporates a twitter-based messaging system for students to communicate about course materials. Much of the content in Cachalot is highly accessible to the general public, providing a novel way to educate people about marine science. This application has been developed as a framework, portable to other classes and other purposes.http://superpod.ml.duke.edu/cachalot

4:00-4:15pm - Break

4:15-4:30pm - TechNyou – Building an online teaching community and developing critical thinking in students - Rob Thomas
Robert Thomas from the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research discusses the science education resource www.technyou.edu.au/education, an Australian Government initiative for high school science teachers. The resource provides materials in the fields of biotechnology and nanotechnology, and covers student learning objectives, including creative thinking and effective communication.

4:30-4:45pm - A new way to fundraise for science: the SciFund Challenge - Jai Ranganathan
Can scientists raise money for their research through crowdfunding? In November and December, 49 scientists took the leap in the SciFund Challenge. Find out the lessons that were learned about how research can be funded in this new way.

4:45-5:00pm Quartzy.com: Accelerating Science with Free Web-Based Lab Management Tools - Adam Regelmann
Quartzy.com launched in 2009, and is quickly becoming the standard way for bench scientists to manage their lab Inventories, Orders, Protocols, and Shared Equipment. Thousands of scientists from all over the world use Quartzy to manage their labs. Because of the networked environment, Quartzy encourages collaboration by helping scientists find and use the stuff they need for their experiments. Quartzy co-founder, Adam Regelmann, MD, PhD, will give an overview of the site and announce some exciting updates for 2012.

Friday January 20, 2012 2:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 8

2:00pm

Science lab and museum tours

A limited number of tour spots are available. See the Science Lab and Museum Tours page for more information and a sign-up form.

Tours include:

  • Duke Lemur Center
  • Behind the scenes at the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences (Raleigh)
  • Behind the scenes at the Museum of Life and Science (Durham)
  • Forensic Anthropology Lab (NCSU)
  • Constructed Facilities Lab (NCSU)
  • Pyroman and MIST Lab (NCSU)
  • NC State Solar House
  • Science of Ink at Dogstar Tattoo
  • Art+Photo Nature Walk at the J.C. Raulston Arboretum

Tour groups will depart shortly after 1 PM -- grab a boxed lunch and meet your group at the front door.

Friday January 20, 2012 2:00pm - 5:00pm
TBA

6:30pm

Banquet & Storytelling with The Monti

UPDATED TIME: please be back bewteen 6:30pm and 7pm for the start of the banquet.

Science + Storytelling + Good food & drink

Friday January 20, 2012 6:30pm - 10:00pm
Room 2
 
Saturday, January 21
 

8:00am

Morning check in

Get ready for the final day.

 

Saturday January 21, 2012 8:00am - 9:30am
McKimmon Conference Ctner (1101 Gorman St., Raleigh, NC 27606)

9:30am

Blogging to save the world: Conservation biology and social media

Students, researchers, and staff from the University of Miami's RJ Dunlap Marine Conservation Program will discuss how their lab uses social media tools to educate people about the marine environment and how they use these tools to encourage science-based conservation policies. The discussion will include using Twitter to teach 'introduction to marine biology lectures' online, webinars and other free online resources for educators, a 'virtual expedition', and more. Additionally, the speakers will share their personal experiences using social media to generate support for conservation-friendly policy changes using petitions, encouraging people to contact policymakers directly, and other techniques. We will also discuss the strengths and weaknesses of social media technology as it applies to conservation biology in general, as well as the future of these tools for this purpose.

Saturday January 21, 2012 9:30am - 10:30am
Room 4

9:30am

Communicating with Images on Blogs
This discussion will focus on improving images (illustration, photography, data viz) on blogs. Expanding on a session from SCIO09, you need not have attended the earlier session. In this session we will discuss and share:
--Why use images on your blog? What makes an image effective at communicating an idea?
--Where to find images (open-source, artists for hire; share your favourite places to find images)
--An overview of copyright and Creative Commons Licences and proper image credits (Note: "Image by Wikipedia" is um, not right)
--How to effectively re-size images so they don't cause your blog to load s l o w l y.
--Quick tutorial using free software (Gimp) Picnik? to show how to reduce image size.
Saturday January 21, 2012 9:30am - 10:30am
Room 7

9:30am

Digital Preservation and Science Online
Preserving Science Online? What should we be keeping for posterity? Science is now a largely digital affair. A lot of resources are being invested in ensuring that scientific datasets and digital incarnations of traditional scholarly journals will be around for the future. However, little effort has been spent on the preservation of new modes of science communication; like blogging and podcasting, or on things like citizen science projects. After a brief introduction to digital preservation, this session will serve to brainstorm and identify critical at-risk digital content and articulate why that content is important. Time permitting, we will kick around ideas for how we might go about putting partnerships together to collect and preserve this content. Come prepared to discuss what science is happening online that you think is important and why? How should we go about selecting what to preserve? Lastly, who should go about ensuring long term access to this content?
Saturday January 21, 2012 9:30am - 10:30am
Room 5

9:30am

Story as Shape or Song: Geometry and Music as Longform Nonfiction Structural Models
Nonfiction narratives longer than about 3000 words often demand different, more various structures than shorter pieces do. In this workshop, authors and longform writers Deborah Blum and David Dobbs will describe open a discussion of literally storytelling by describing how geometric shapes (Blum) and musical forms (Dobbs can offer models for conceptualizing, organizing, and composing narratives from about 3000 words up. Is you story a parabola? A circle? A pyramid? Or is it a pop song, a fugue, or a sonata? With a variety of forms to consider as models, you can create what Blum calls "a structured seduction of the reader." Which, when it works, makes everybody feel good. Pulitzer Prize winner Deborah Blum, author of The Poisoner's Handbook and Love at Goon Park, writes for leading magazines and literary journals including Scientific American, Slate, Lapham's Quarterly and Tin House and keeps her blog, Speakeasy Science, at PLOSblogs. She teaches nonfiction writing at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. David Dobbs, author of Reef Madness and the Atavist hit My Mother's Lover, writes features for The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic, National Geographic, Slate, and other magazines, and is working on his fourth book, The Orchid and the Dandelion. His blog Neuron Culture is at Wired.
Saturday January 21, 2012 9:30am - 10:30am
Room 1c/d

9:30am

Students as Messengers of Science
High school and undergraduate students have a unique place in engaging their communities through science, while becoming the next generation of scientists, science writers, and journalists. As an increasingly diverse pool of students engage their families in their pursuits through mentoring, research and other immersion programs, as well as writing and journalism, they lay the groundwork for making science accessible for the non-scientists in their lives, representing a range of diverse ethnic and socio-economic communities. How as educators and mentors do we nurture them as scientists and communicators? What skills and practices are key for helping young people reflect on learning while also developing effective communication skills? This session will foster a discussion of the barriers, challenges and best practices for creating the infrastructure, mentoring relationships, and building the confidence of students as they experience science to help them develop their voices. The session will also explore how we recruit readers of such sites, and will explore examples of online media connected with science engagement programs geared toward high school and undergraduate students that are creating a local culture of science, among traditionally underrepresented communities, with a local impact.
Saturday January 21, 2012 9:30am - 10:30am
Room 6

9:30am

Weird and wonderful stories in the history of science
The history of science is filled with great stories: entertaining, enlightening, and sometimes horrifying! In this lighthearted session we'll talk about using weird tales in the history of science to liven up your science posts and teach about science and its methodology. People are encouraged to bring their favorite historical stories to share, and discuss what lessons the story provides. The moderators will also tell some of their favorite unusual tales!
Saturday January 21, 2012 9:30am - 10:30am
Room 8

9:30am

Data Journalism: Talking the talk
We want this workshop to be first and foremost USEFUL to people, without requiring many in depth tutorials or technical explanations. One of the main hurdles on the adventure that is data journalism, is knowing just enough to be able to have a conversation with someone who can make your data dreams into data realities (read: programmers and developers). We're less interested in perfecting your program skills and much more keen to get you familiar with the tools and processes you need to get your big project off the ground. We'll explore how to get started and launch into a whirlwind tour through the (free!) resources for journalists looking to work with data. This will be less of a workshop and more of a crash course: What you need to know before you even know what you need to know (about data journalism).
Saturday January 21, 2012 9:30am - 10:30am
Room 3

10:45am

Advocacy in medical blogging/communication--can you be an advocate and still be fair?
There is already a session on how reporting facts on controversial topics can lead to accusations of advocacy. But what if you *are* an avowed advocate in a medical context, either as a person with a specific condition (autism, multiple sclerosis, cancer, heart disease) or an ally? How can you, as a self-advocate or ally of an advocate, still retain credibility--and for what audience?
Saturday January 21, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
Room 4

10:45am

Charting Your Own Course: How to Make It As a Freelancer
Freelancing can be tough. Generating ideas, pitching stories, balancing projects, planning ahead to make sure the money keeps coming… How do full-time freelancers do it? What does it take to start science-writing without a safety net, especially during a time when paid work is increasingly elusive? Whether you're a veteran freelancer or thinking about taking the plunge, bring your questions, tips, and tricks.
Saturday January 21, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
Room 1c/d

10:45am

Drowning in Information! How Can We Create Organization & Balance - Tools and strategies for managing information overload (science and otherwise)
We're all suffering from the same condition: information overload and filter failure. Yet some people seem to manage the torrent of information more efficiently and effortlessly than others. What's their secret? We'll take a tour of some of the tools available to manage the mass of science-related content -- from RSS to reference managers, and from collaboration docs to social aggregation. We'll also reveal the daily reading habits of some of the best-known purveyors of science content, and come armed with your own tips for battling info overload too.
Saturday January 21, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
Room 5

10:45am

Next generation scientific society and conference
The most interesting scientific meetings for the participants are small, with lots of time for informal interactions and discussion of not-yet-published results. They sometimes happen in remote or unusual locations and are often funded by foundations or agencies rather than scientific societies. Such meetings have many drawbacks that go against the principles of open science -- they encourage cliques, exclude many people who may be interested, and may fail to make a broad impact outside the participants. The documents that come out of such meetings, often edited volumes running hundreds of dollars, look good on a shelf but have little urgency or value. Journalists and the public may not even know that an interesting meeting is happening! This session will explore ways to create hybrid conferences, that combine the focus of a small meeting with a broader communication and publication strategy. The questions include: When is streaming media useful? How best to integrate remote participants? What kind of video product after the conference is most useful? How can a small meeting accomplish open access publication? What kind of advance timeline is necessary to catalyze the participants? How can such meetings be leveraged for outreach opportunities? Discussing how scientific societies and other scientific non-profits can work with science bloggers to increase the outreach potential of both. More organizations are becoming interested in recruiting bloggers, and many scientist bloggers are interested in blogging meetings related to their interests. We are interested in bringing the two together, and sharing our experiences as bloggers who blog meetings, and as organizers for societies that have worked with bloggers. How are bloggers different from mainstream reporters? Why should an organization work with one? How should organizations work with bloggers in terms of registration, setup, and facilitating their work? From the blogger's end, what are organizations looking for in science bloggers, and what should we expect from the organization? What are best practices of blogging conferences? How do you approach an organization about blogging for one of their meetings?
Saturday January 21, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
Room 6

10:45am

Science writing in and for developing nations
To what extent might good science coverage improve the lot of the so-called ‘developing’ nations, what practical steps might help achieve this, what are the needs of science writers/journalists in those locations, etc. This topic may seem to clash with the demographics of those attending scio with most attendees coming from North America, the UK & Europe, but it’s topic that appeals to a wish to improve the lot of "developing" nations. It also appeals in that I’ve seen so little discussion of science writing/journalism in developing nations. I’m taking ‘developing nations’ very loosely here to allow for examples from nations that might be considered further developed than the poorest of the poor. In Western nations we rally against pseudoscience and poor reporting of science. For developing nations these issues run deeper. Would it be idealism to aspire to shift the mindsets of those in pivotal positions in those nations? Mindsets are, in many respects, the hardest thing to shift and practical initiatives can come to nothing if the will and want to use them isn’t there. Would these nations be helped by media there showing “heroes” in sound science and practical science-based applications? Is there a gap in who traditional media reach (think of low literacy in these nations) - would alternative communication be more effective? (Travelling seminars, perhaps?) What case examples might serve as prototypes? What organisations will, or might, support ventures like these?
Saturday January 21, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
Room 3

10:45am

The Music of Science: An Effective Tool for Science Communication?
A review of what's currently happening in the music and science worlds and how it influences the public perception of science. From Symphony of Science to Bjork's new album, Biophilia, in what way do people making science musical inspire themselves and others? We'll present examples from scientists and science communicators who make educational music about science to musicians who use science as a vehicle for personal expression. We'll take examples from the big names and the smaller names and analyze their reach and effectiveness. We'll also discuss how to get involved in the conversation by presenting platforms for scientist-musician collaborations across distances.
Saturday January 21, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
Room 7

10:45am

Why the resistance to science blogging?
Many scientists and journal editors actively dismiss and denigrate all scientists who blog. They argue that bloggers are anonymous, untrustworthy, engage in ad hominem attacks, have no authority, and cannot (indeed, should not) be considered to be part of the scientific record. This session could examine ways to change the culture within peer-reviewed journals in particular that accepts – maybe even encourages! – the usefulness of blogging and other online discussion. How can bloggers change the attitude of journal editors, editorial boards, and reviewers? Can blogging, post-publication peer review, and other online activities be brought into the fold as part of the scientific record?
Saturday January 21, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
Room 8

11:45am

LUNCH ‘n’ LAUGH
A little science comedy to go with your lunch.
Moderators
Saturday January 21, 2012 11:45am - 1:00pm
Room 2

1:00pm

'It's Good To Be The King' - Blogging the Mel Brooks Way!
How to get started, engage a audience, conduct blog research, establish collaborations, keep your writing fresh, appreciate your followers, effectively deal with detractors and many other blogging lessons can be gleaned from an unlikely source - Mel Brooks movies (Blazing Saddles, Young Frankenstein, The Producers, Space Balls, Robin Hood: Men in Tights...). We will present lessons learned through blogging and Brooks movies in this fun and informative session.
Saturday January 21, 2012 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room 7

1:00pm

Art and Science, 4.0 - Accurate, Personal and Powerful: commissioned Science-Art
Commissioned art and illustration have always been collaborative between the artist, the editor and the client. When science-art is commissioned, the added voice reality and scientific tradition enter the mix. How does this affect illustrations for publications? How does bad art affect public perception.? Just how many edits does a scientific journal demand, anyway? And what happens when science -art is commissioned to go on a scientist's wall, or on their skin?
Saturday January 21, 2012 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room 1c/d

1:00pm

Can Democracy Still Work in the Age of Science?
Jefferson’s central idea of democracy is that “whenever the people are well-informed, they can be trusted with their own government.” Jefferson thought it required “no very high degree” of education for people to be well-enough informed. But what happens in a world dominated by complex science? Are the people still well-enough informed to be trusted with their own government? Why or why not? Today, science is under political attack like never before. At the same time, science impacts almost every aspect of modern life, and is poised to create more knowledge in the next 40 years than in all of recorded history. Can we expect attacks to increase or lessen? Why is this happening? Why is it so much worse in the United States than the UK or EU? Why are people the world over protesting against both autocratic and democratic governments? Can democracy survive the rush of science? We’ll compare strategies scientists and journalists can use online and off to manage these emerging science challenges – together with a world of unsolved legacy environmental science challenges – for science and better public policy.
Moderators
Saturday January 21, 2012 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room 4

1:00pm

Genomic Medicine: From Bench to Bedside
his session will serve as an introduction to the topic of personalized medicine from the perspective of major stakeholders including: scientists, physicians, patients and their advocates, community groups and media professionals. We’ll begin with an introduction to the basic concepts and efforts in this area, followed by a discussion of information resources to serve stakeholder groups including relevant clinical, consumer health, and advocacy and policy resources. Various initiatives by government agencies, the commercial sector and academia will be discussed, including: Genetics Home Reference, 23andMe, PatientsLikeMe, and more.
Saturday January 21, 2012 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room 6

1:00pm

Never Tell Me the Odds: Assessing Certainty and Probability in Scientific Data
Many stories in science aimed both at the general public and technical stories between scientists hinge on understanding probability, but our brains aren't really built for comprehending probability. However, it's not really that hard to grasp on a basic level, so we can talk about the relative chances of a particular statement being "right" -- and avoid insulting anybody's intelligence in the process. (I did something of this sort in my Science Vs. Pseudoscience class last year. We actually tested telepathy statistically.) Trained scientists know (on an intellectual level at least) that absolute certainty isn't known, and working with error bars or other measures of uncertainty is standard. However, as narratives often focus on conflict and seeking out the rare dissenting voice on matters where there is a great deal of consensus (e.g. global climate change), it's essential to get an idea of levels of uncertainty. This session might involve learning to read (or learning to explain for those who know how to read) plots and other figures that have error quantified in them.
Saturday January 21, 2012 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room 5

1:00pm

Raising money for your science and journalism with crowdfunding

Crowdfunding is a fundraising tool that has exploded in popularity recently, especially in the arts. What potential does crowdfunding hold for raising money for science and journalism? Journalism has its very own crowdfunding platform - Spot.us. For science, the recent #SciFund Challenge shows the potential for raising money for research in this way. Join the discussion about the possibilities and pitfalls raised by crowdfunding for science and journalism.

Saturday January 21, 2012 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room 3

1:00pm

Writing about science for women's (and men's) magazines and not being ashamed of it, dammit
The major women's magazines — SELF, Health, More and others — reach audiences of more than 1 million per month in their paper versions and several million more on the web. Yet there's science-writing community debate over whether we should write for them, to bring science to the masses (and also because they pay pretty well), or whether they are so compromised by simplification and error that writing for them is a scarlet letter of shame.
Saturday January 21, 2012 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room 8

2:15pm

Cyberscreen Science Film Festival
The Second Annual filmfest.
Saturday January 21, 2012 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Room 1c/d

3:45pm

4:45pm

Closing remarks
Moderators
avatar for Anton Zuiker

Anton Zuiker

Co-founder and chairman of the board, ScienceOnline
Blogger, editor, organizer.

Saturday January 21, 2012 4:45pm - 5:00pm
Room 1c/d
 
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